Pemba is the capital of Cabo Delgado, the most northerly province of Mozambique. It is a pretty palm-roofed coastal town built at the mouth of an enormous natural harbour.

Pemba is renowned as being a prime destination for water sport and diving enthusiasts as the coral reef lies close to the shore. The abundant fishing waters at St Lazarus Banks are also within easy reach.

Offshore diving and snorkelling is reckoned to be some of the best in Southern Africa. There are many pristine, white beaches along the coast, including the famous Wimbe beach to the north.

Old Town
The Old Town contains several traditional markets. Also known as ‘bazares’ these can be found in the ‘bairros’ of Paquitequete, Natite and Cariacó. In these quarters you can also admire the silver smiths at work on their verandas.

These craftsman transform coins into silver necklaces, bracelets and earrings. This is an old art, passed down through many generations from father to son.

Praia do Wimbe
This is a palm-lined beach with white sand and clear blue waters.

Praia do Farol
You can walk along Wimbe beach in a southerly direction to the lighthouse (farol) and beach nearby.

Quirimbas Archipelago
The Quirimbas Archipelago consists of 32 coral islands stretching from Pemba to the Rovuma River, which forms the natural frontier between Tanzania and Mozambique. The area has never been developed and remains an unexplored tourist paradise.

The southern most 11 of these islands and a vast expanse of mainland forest are included in the Quirimbas National Park - a conservation effort to preserve and protect the area. Quirimba Island is the main island of the Quirimbas

The Quirimbas have enormous cultural and historical value, with a combination of Arabian, Portuguese, and African influences. The magnificent old fortresses on Ibo Island boast intriguing historical and fascinating sites. In historic times, the island was an important Portuguese trade post.

Getting There
There are daily flights from Maputo, direct flights from from Johannesburg twice a week and from Nairobi 2 times a week.

The almost 3000 kilometer road journey from Johannesburg does not require a 4-wheel-drive as most of the way is good tar with some 500 km's of slow bumpy dirt road.